Sprott Global Resource Investments

Anthony Bevilaqua

Investment Executive



Tony joined Sprott with over 10 years' experience with contrarian-style firms such as Fisher Investments in San Francisco and Zacks Investment Management in Chicago, IL. His primary focus was managing high net worth client relationships with a total of more than $100 million in assets. After the 2008 financial crisis, he and Peter Schiff created Euro Pacific Metals, where Mr. Bevilaqua went on to serve as Vice President in New York City. His entrepreneurial spirit continued during his tenure with Euro Pacific, as he also co-founded a sports medicine venture in the Boston area.

Tony was drawn to the Sprott organization through his following of Eric Sprott, Rick Rule, Marc Faber, and other Sprott analysts. He believes that focusing on economic realities and paying close attention to the teachings of history can help protect investors against the dangers of "following the herd." Tony uses a collective approach to harness Sprott's best ideas to create diversified portfolios of precious metals and natural resource investments for his clients.

Tony grew up in Pennsylvania and graduated from Temple University in Philadelphia with a BBA in Economics. He currently lives in Carlsbad, CA with his family and holds FINRA Series 7 and 63 registrations.



 



 



 



 



 






 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 






 

The page you are about to view is not affiliated with Sprott Global Resource Investments Ltd. or any of its related companies.

Investors should carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, time horizon and liquidity needs before making an investment. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns.

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The page you are about to view is affiliated with Sprott Global Resource Investments Ltd. but is not a regulated entity and not part of FINRA.

Investors should carefully consider the investment objectives, risks, time horizon and liquidity needs before making an investment. Past performance is no guarantee of future returns. Securities discussed may not be a suitable investment for your portfolio.”

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